Handout Resources

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The Wall of Saints (Image)

The Wall of Saints consists of the following: St. Romanos, the Melodist; St. Jacob Netsvetov, Enlightener of the People of Alaska; Holy Hieromartyr Juvenal of Alaska and Holy Martyr Peter the Aleut; Holy Hierarch John, Archbishop of Shanghai and San Francisco; Holy Hierarch Tikhon of Moscow; Holy Priest Martyr John of Chicago; Holy Priest Martyr Alexander of New York City; Holy Blessed Xenia of St. Petersburg; Holy Hierarch Theophan the Recluse; Holy Righteous Alexis of Wilkes-Barre; Holy Priest Martyr Maksym of Carpatho-Rus; and Holy Hierarch Nicholas of South Canaan.

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Lazarus Saturday & Palm Sunday Troparion (HTML)

Author(s): DCE

Troparion for Lazarus Saturday & Palm Sunday to be used as handouts to students during lesson discussions.

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Nativity of The Theotokos Line Drawing (PDF)

Author(s): Fr. John Matusiak

The line drawing of the Nativity of The Theotokos. Can be used throughout the Theotokos Unit or as a general handout.

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Icon of the Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ (Image)

This icon is more than just a beautiful Christmas piece. It conveys important theological truth as all icons do. Jesus is wrapped in swaddling cloths in such a way that he resembles one wrapped for burial. This indicates that He was born to die for us. The red heifer is present in the cave, which is symbolic of being offered as a sacrifice for the sins of the people. The ass which bore Mary and Him out of town for his birth is there foreshadowing the Triumphal Entry as He goes willingly to the Cross to reconcile us to Himself. The angel in the mountains is shown above two shepherds. This tells the story of how the angel appeared to the shepherds singing and glorifying the birth of Christ, calling them to join in the praise. St. Joseph the Betrothed is shown in a struggle against his temptation. The old man talking to him represents his temptation, when he considered "putting Mary away quietly" not knowing whose child she was to bear. The three men on horseback are the Magi following the star that is being guided by God so they can worship the King, Jesus Christ.

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Icon of the Conception of the Theotokos (Image)

Ss. Joachim & Anna were childless for 50 years of their married life. Then the Archangel Gabriel appeared to them, each separately, and foretold the birth of a daughter. God had heard their prayers. They had always been very devout and gave one third of their income to the Temple, one third to the poor and lived on the remaining third. St. Joachim lived to be 80 and St. Anna lived to be 79. In response to the blessing and the Archangel's prophecy, they dedicated Mary to the Lord and presented her to be raised in the Temple from a young child.

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The Vladimir Icon of the Mother of God (Image)

Known in Greek as Eleousa and in Slavonic as Oumilenie, this icon is also called the Virgin of Tenderness or of Mercy. The relationship between Mother and Child is expressed with stunning force: taking refuge in her, He touches her chin with one hand and presses his cheek against hers. Her pensive, sorrowful eyes foresee his Passion and she embraces him with affectionate, maternal protection. The three golden stars which adorn her mantle, one above the forehead and one on each shoulder, signify her virginity before, during, and after giving birth. This icon was given by the Church in Constantinople to the Russian Church in Kiev c.1131.When Kiev was destroyed by the Golden Horde, it was removed to the city of Vladimir in 1155. In 1395, it was moved to Moscow. It has been repaired and damaged many times, so that you can see the various layers of painting on it. This is a copy of that icon

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Tikhvin Icon of the Mother of God (Image)

The icon follows the "Hodigitria" model and is similar in style to the ancient Iveron icon of Our Lady. It differs in that the Christ child's legs are crossed, while the sole of His foot is turned to the viewer. For a complete story of this icon go to http://ocafs.oca.org/FeastSaintsLife.asp?FSID=101821

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Entrance of the Theotokos - Liturgical Texts (HTML)

Text of Troparion and Kontakion for the Feast

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Icon of The Presentation (Meeting) of Our Lord (Image)

Forty days after Jesus Christ's birth, the Theotokos and her betrothed, Joseph, brought her Son to the Temple to make the customary offering for purification; a pair of turtledoves or two young pigeons. There, the prophetess Anna and the aged Simeon met them. St. Simeon, one of the translators of the Septuagint, sensed the fulfillment of Isaiah's puzzling prophecies of a virginal birth (Isaiah 7:14), and received the young pre-eternal God Incarnate just as he was promised he would before his death. Then St. Simeon praised God and said, "Now lettest Thou Thy servant depart in peace, O Master."

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Icon of The Crucifixion of the Lord (Image)

Crucifixion was a cruel method of execution but one that the Lord willingly endured for mankind. Christ is shown dead in this icon to emphasize His humanity. The cross symbolizes the burdens we all must carry and has become the predominant symbol of Christianity.

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Icon of The Resurrection of Christ (Image)

Christ is shown tenderly pulling our ancestral parents, Adam and Eve, from their tombs. Through His resurrection, Christ has shattered the gates of hell and scattered the chains and locks that bind mankind.

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